Warren’s Medicare for All plan: Private insurance employees displaced, price tag in the ‘trillions’

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren arrives to speak at a fund-raising fish fry for U.S. Rep. Abby Finkenauer, D-Iowa, Saturday, Nov. 2, 2019, at Hawkeye Downs Expo Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

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UPDATED 5:45 PM PT — Sunday, November 3, 2019

Senator Elizabeth Warren is rolling out her ‘Medicare for All’ plan, which is likely to impact Americans working in the health industry. While speaking on the campaign trail on Friday, Warren touted her $52 trillion proposal.

Her remarks came in response to concerns about how she would fund a single payer public insurance system. The senator is now being pressed on what would happen to those who work in the private health insurance industry. She has said the answer is to simply move people around.

“Some of the people currently working in health insurance will work in other parts of insurance — some will work for Medicaid,” stated Warren. “No one gets left behind.”

Critics were quick to point out that health insurance differs vastly from the other opportunities she suggested, such as auto insurance. Warren’s plan also claimed to keep spending in place without taking into account the cost of private citizens’ transition into the new system.

Democratic presidential candidate South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks during a fund-raising fish fry for U.S. Rep. Abby Finkenauer, D-Iowa, Saturday, Nov. 2, 2019, at Hawkeye Downs Expo Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Mayor Pete Buttigieg has questioned her plan and the claims of its advocates. During a Sunday interview, the mayor was critical of the so-called ‘universal healthcare’ plan. He questioned the authority of the proposal and its aim to make decisions for everyone in the U.S.

“I think it could very well be the long-term destination, but there has to be some humility in our policy here,” stated Buttigieg. “Let’s put this out there and see if it’s really the best plan for everybody.”

He was also skeptical of the high cost estimates and how it will be paid for.

“Well, the math is certainly controversial,” said Buttigieg. “Again, there are variations in the estimates — in the trillions and trillions of dollars.”

The mayor has introduced his own take on healthcare, which includes a choice to opt into a similar nationwide Medicare plan.