USPS sends inaccurate voting info. to Utah, Nev. voters

FILE – In this Nov. 1, 2016, file photo, Mail-in ballots for the 2016 General Election sits in trays at an elections ballot center at the Salt Lake County Government Center in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 5:05 PM PT – Wednesday, September 16, 2020

Voters across America have reported they are receiving mailers from the U.S. Postal Service with misleading information about this year’s election. According to officials in Utah and Nevada, residents have been receiving postcards from the USPS that contain false information about absentee voting.

The cards, which were sent out nationwide, urged voters to request their ballots at least 15 days before the election. However, both states are implementing a new model that will allow registered voters to automatically receive their ballots in the mail.

The cards also told residents to add postage before sending their ballots in, even though mail-in ballots come with prepaid postage. Election officials were only made aware of these mailers after residents voiced their concerns.

“We were first made aware of the mailer when our office started to receive phone calls from voters, who had received the postcard in the mail and were confused by it,” explained election official Wayne Thorley. “I applaud their (the USPS) attempt to get information out there, wish they would work a little more closely with election officials.”

The USPS issued a statement shortly thereafter, claiming the postcards were sent to people nationwide and were not intended to be state specific.

FILE – In this May 28, 2020, file photo processing work on mail in ballots for the Pennsylvania Primary election is being done at the Butler County Bureau of Elections, in Butler, Pa. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)

The discovery of the misleading information came days after President Trump called Nevada’s voting system into question. Ballots will reportedly be sent out to registered voters on October 13th and must be returned by October 23rd to be counted.

Meanwhile, for the first time ever, Tennessee voters will not be required to vote in person for this year’s general election. A state law was tossed out, allowing them to cast their votes remotely in this election.

The move was met with resistance from some younger voters.

“In my personal opinion, this is the most important election of our lives,” stated student Artur Shaylitsa. “I would rather go in person and do it.”

Moving forward, election officials have advised voters to check their registration status, register if they aren’t already and update their addresses. The President has also recommended heading to polling stations on Election Day to make sure your vote counts.

MORE NEWS: President Trump: Americans Should Ensure Mail-In Vote Is Counted