Pentagon extends U.S. border mission as another migrant caravan leaves from Honduras

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 6:53 AM PT — Tuesday, January 15, 2019

The Pentagon is not wasting any time in securing the southern border, even as lawmakers continue to debate the matter on Capitol Hill.

The Defense Department is one of few agencies already funded and not affected by the partial government shutdown, which is why they’re extending their mission at the southern border through September.

It’s still unclear how many troops will be a part of this, but their mission will be to secure existing barriers by laying down barbed wire and operating security cameras among other tasks.

This operation comes as another migrant caravan left to make the dangerous trip north, with hopes of being granted asylum in the U.S. This news has already made its way to the White House, with President Trump using it as another example of why a border wall is necessary for national security.

“There is another major caravan forming right now in Honduras and, so far, we’re trying to break it up, but, so far, it’s bigger than anything we’ve seen and a drone isn’t going to stop it,” he stated. “And a sensor isn’t going to stop it, but you know what’s going to stop it in its tracks — a nice, powerful wall.”

Migrants begin their journey under a steady rain as a caravan of several hundred sets off walking toward the United States, from a main bus station in San Pedro Sula, Honduras, late Monday, Jan. 14, 2019. Yet another caravan of Central American migrants left from Honduras, seeking to reach the U.S. border, following the same route followed by thousands on at least three caravans last year. (AP Photo/Delmer Martinez)

Like the previous caravans, members of this one say they’re leaving their home countries because their government is failing and their communities are too dangerous.However, the new caravan will need to strategize differently.

The Mexican government said they’re willing to grant asylum to these migrants, but only if they enter the country legally and if they register for visas. If they follow in their predecessors footsteps, they’ll be deported back to their home countries before even attempting to make it in to the U.S. This in itself could be a dead end as the White House is showing no signs of backing down in its fight for increased border security.

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