Nepal’s worst airplane tragedy

Graphic content / Rescuers pull the body of a victim who died in a Yeti Airlines plane crash in Pokhara on January 16, 2023. - Nepal observed a day of mourning on January 16 for the victims of the nation's deadliest aviation disaster in three decades, with 67 people confirmed killed in the plane crash. (Photo by PRAKASH MATHEMA / AFP) (Photo by PRAKASH MATHEMA/AFP via Getty Images)
Graphic content / Rescuers pull the body of a victim who died in a Yeti Airlines plane crash in Pokhara on January 16, 2023. – Nepal observed a day of mourning on January 16 for the victims of the nation’s deadliest aviation disaster in three decades, with 67 people confirmed killed in the plane crash. (Photo by PRAKASH MATHEMA / AFP) (Photo by PRAKASH MATHEMA/AFP via Getty Images)

OAN Annytama Bhowmik
UPDATED 6:40 PM PT – Monday, January 16, 2023

A short-haul flight crashed on Sunday in Nepal with 72 people aboard, being named as one of the deadliest crashes since 1992. The 15-year-old aircraft had a serial number of 754 and was registered as 9N-ANC.

According to the flight tracker Flightradar24, the plane departed Kathmandu on schedule at 10:32 a.m. local time and was expected to arrive at 10:59 a.m. From the nation’s capital, Kathmandu, the plane was scheduled to fly for 27 minutes to Pokhara, a well-known tourist destination 125 miles to the west, close to the Annapurna Mountain Range. As they flew over the Seti River gorge, east of the city, the crew last established touch with Pokhara Tower at 10:50 a.m.

Following the event, the Yeti Airlines NYT 691 black boxes were found by search teams.

Nepal’s Civil Aviation Authority has stated that the short-haul flight was carrying 68 passengers, including six children, and four crew members. The passengers included five Indians, four Russians, two South Koreans and one each from Argentina, Ireland, Australia, and France.

Among passengers was Sonu Jaiswal, 32, of Ghazipur, India, who captured the descent of the aircraft from his seat. He was travelling with three friends. As the plane reached Pokhara, he was trying to see it out of his window while yelling “it’s a good time” with his pals. Jaiswal recorded while grinning and panning the camera around the relatively serene flight that showed no signs of concern. Just seconds later, the terrified guests’ shouts can be momentarily heard before the screen is engulfed in flames.

Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal declared Monday a day of national mourning.