N.Y. Gov. Hochul speaks out on devastation of Hurricane Ida

New York Gov. Kathy Hochul in New York City. (Photo by Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

New York Gov. Kathy Hochul (D) in New York City. (Photo by Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 9:17 AM PT – Monday, September 6, 2021

Gov. Kathy Hochul (D-N.Y.) addressed the mourning New Yorkers after last week’s flooding turned deadly. During a public address on Sunday, Hochul stressed her concerns about high rainfall in Central Park last week.

“That horrific events of Wednesday evening, when we literally saw record shattering rainfall, but the record shattering is almost an anomaly because we set the record a week before,” she explained. “We shattered that record with over 3.1 inches. This is per hour, my friends. This is not overnight. This is not over day. This was per hour.”

Hochul added the flood was beyond “the wave action off the sound or off the ocean.”

“It’s when the heavens break loose and multiple storm systems converge and they drop a Niagara Falls level of water on our city,” she expressed. “How do you prepare for that?”

 

The New York governor went on to tell New Yorkers severe weather would continue to devastate their state.

She went on to say, “after what I witnessed firsthand and the lives we lost, 17 New Yorkers no longer with us because of the weather, I’m operating on the assumption that this could happen again in another 10 days.”

Hochul then turned her speech into a lecture about so-called climate change.

“I’m not going to wait for someone to tell me that the climate change effect on our weather is in the future,” she asserted. “I’m not going to have someone tell me that these events are every 100 years, 500 years, 1,000 years.”

As families of the New Yorkers who died are still mourning, Hochul suggested making an investment in government funded infrastructure.

A person who eventually waded to a truck, moves amongst cars and other trucks that are stranded by high water Thursday, Sept 2, 2021, on the Major Deegan Expressway in Bronx borough of New York as high water left behind by Hurricane Ida still stands on the highway hours later. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

A person who eventually waded to a truck, moves amongst cars and other trucks that are stranded by high water on the Major Deegan Expressway in Bronx borough of New York as high water left behind by Hurricane Ida still stands on the highway hours later. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

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