Ky. judge temporarily blocks near total abortion ban

Supporters of abortion rights chant slogans outside a Planned Parenthood clinic during a protest in West Hollywood, Calif., Friday, June 24, 2022. The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to end constitutional protections for abortion has cleared the way for states to impose bans and restrictions on abortion — and will set off a series of legal battles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Supporters of abortion rights chant slogans outside a Planned Parenthood clinic during a protest in West Hollywood, Calif., Friday, June 24, 2022. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

OAN NEWSROOM
UPDATED 4:53 PM PT – Friday, July 22, 2022

A Kentucky judge continues to block the state’s near-total ban on abortions. On Friday, Judge Mitch Perry extended his June order which blocked the state from enforcing its so-called “trigger law” that bans abortions after six weeks.

The ruling claimed the law would violate residents right to privacy and self determination. Finding significant state constitutional questions about the two laws, Perry ordered them blocked until the dispute is resolved at trial. A trial date has not been set.

“Once again, the courts have rightly stopped Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s relentless efforts to ban abortion, which would have devastating consequences for Kentuckians,” said a Planned Parenthood spokesperson. “No one should be forced to carry a pregnancy against their will or flee the state to access essential health care. Kentuckians have a right to abortion under the state constitution and we’ll continue fighting for that right so that every person in the commonwealth can get the care they need.”

Cameron, a Republican who has been seeking to enforce the two laws and other abortion legislation enacted by the GOP-controlled General Assembly, issued a statement that he was “disappointed” with Perry’s ruling and planned to appeal.

“The judge’s suggestion that Kentucky’s constitution contains a right to abortion is not grounded in the text and history of our state’s governing document,” Cameron voiced. “We will continue our steadfast defense of these bipartisan laws that represent the commonwealth’s commitment to the lives of the unborn.”

Perry’s order found that “the fundamental right for a woman to control her own body free from government interference” outweighs the state’s interest in protecting a fetus before it is viable. In his order, Perry was determined that abortion services are health care, a point disputed by abortion opponents.

“Plaintiffs assert and this court agrees, that abortion is a form of health care,” the judge stated. “It is provided by licensed medical professionals in licensed medical facilities, just like many other medical procedures.”

In the meantime, Cameron continues to vow to fight this decision at the appellate level.

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