Community shows frustration over Boston’s plans to clean up ‘Methadone Mile’

386595 01: A Red Line subway car, known as the T in Boston, crosses the Charles River March 12, 2001 in Cambridge, MA. Boston's subway system, the oldest in the nation, has plans to auction off the rights to name four of its busiest stations. Last week's pre-bid meeting brought no potential bidders. (Photo by Darren McCollester/Newsmakers)

A Red Line subway car, known as the T in Boston, crosses the Charles River March 12, 2001 in Cambridge, Mass. (Photo by Darren McCollester/Newsmakers)

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UPDATED 2:53 PM PT – Saturday, October 2, 2021

As the homeless and those battling addiction continue to meet along the epicenter of Boston’s opioid crisis, disputes erupt over plans to clean up the area known as “Methadone Mile.”

Located next to the greater Boston Food Bank in Revere, officials for the nonprofit said it has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on security measures where funding could have been put towards better use. Even city officials have long proposed alternative measures, such as relocating some of the homeless to a hotel inn.

However, it seems many cities want no part in being the new location for a recovery center, citing concerns around the health and safety of those being transported. The stretch was originally meant for healing, but has instead become the hotspot for opioids.

“Something certainly has to be done. Boston really needs to work with Mayor Arrigo here in the city to make sure they find the right situation here for these folks,” said Craig Tornberg, a neighbor in the area.

Meanwhile, neighbors have continued to show frustration over the city’s lack of communication and urgency in regards to how they’re going to clean up the area.

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