Calif. Gov. Newsom vows more gun control after Texas shooting

California Gov. Gavin Newsom discusses the recent mass shooting in Texas, during a news conference in Sacramento, Calif., Wednesday, May 25, 2022. Flanked by lawmakers from both houses of the state legislature, Newsom said he is ready to sign more restrictive gun measures passed by lawmakers.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

California Gov. Gavin Newsom discusses the recent mass shooting in Texas, during a news conference in Sacramento, Calif., Wednesday, May 25, 2022. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

OAN NEWSROOM
UPDATED 2:19 PM PT – Thursday, May 26, 2022

California Governor Gavin Newsom (D) made a vow to enact more gun control measures in response to the shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. During a press conference on Wednesday, Newsom said he was looking to fast track 12 gun control bills that are currently working through the legislature. The governor pledged that he would sign those bills at the end of next month.

“California leads this national conversation,” Newsom stated. “When California moves other states move in the same direction.”

Officials vocalized that Newsom could expedite a bill modeled after a Texas abortion law, allowing private citizens to sue gun manufacturers or distributors over potential incidents.

“California will not stand by as kids across the country are gunned down,” the governor declared. “Guns are now the leading cause of death for kids in America. While the US Senate stands idly by and activist federal judges strike down commonsense gun laws across our nation, California will act with the urgency this crisis demands. The Second Amendment is not a suicide pact. We will not let one more day go by without taking action to save lives.”

Although California already has stringent gun control laws in place, Governor Newsom and legislative leaders will continue working together to expedite additional bills pending that can contribute to the end of gun violence.

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