Blinken: U.S. will ‘monitor’ Afghan security after withdrawal

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken speaks during a press conference with transatlantic alliance NATO's chief on April 14, 2021 at NATO's headquarters in Brussels, as foreign ministers of the US, Britain, France and Germany hold talks today on Afghanistan, after the United States announced the withdrawal of all its troops from the country by September 11. (Photo by Kenzo Tribouillard / POOL / AFP) (Photo by KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken. (Photo by KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 1:30 PM PT – Sunday, April 18, 2021

Joe Biden’s Secretary of State Antony Blinken has claimed a withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan would not compromise the security of that country.

“We will have the means to see if there is a resurgence, a reemergence of a terrorist threat from Afghanistan,” said Blinken. “We’ll be able to see that in real-time with time to take action. And we’re going to be repositioning our forces and our assets to make sure that we guard against the potential re-emergence.”

Blinken suggested U.S. forces would be able to return to Afghanistan if terror group the Taliban moves to restore control over that nation’s politics. He also claimed the U.S. has achieved its objectives in that country, although the Taliban still controls nearly 20 percent of the Afghan territory.

“And we went to take on those who attacked us on 9/11 and to make sure that Afghanistan would not again become a haven for terrorism directed at the United States or any of our allies and partners,” Blinken noted. “And we’ve achieved the objectives that we set out to achieve. Al-Quaeda has been significantly degraded. Its capacity to conduct an attack against the United States, now, from Afghanistan, is not there. And of course, Osama Bin Laden was brought to justice ten years ago.”

In early April, Biden postponed the withdrawal of U.S. troops, which had been slated for May 1 by President Trump, and is now expected by mid-September.

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