New Ransomware Scam Involves Criminals Impersonating IRS

(Photo/Reuters)

August 29, 2017
OAN Newsroom

The IRS is warning citizens of a new cyber-scam that uses ransomware impersonating federal agents to assume control over the victim’s computer data.

Officials say scammers send out emails with both the IRS and FBI emblems demanding the user click on a link to download a form.

The link downloads ransomware instead, taking the user’s computer data hostage until they pay money to the scammers.

The IRS is telling citizens to remember that the agency never contacts a taxpayer through an intimidating email or phone call.

10 Comments on "New Ransomware Scam Involves Criminals Impersonating IRS"

  1. MisterSandman | August 29, 2017 at 4:54 pm |

    This is nothing new…several years ago, the forerunners of ransomware would simply hide your data and plaster a “warning” from the FBI that they had seized your data for suspicious internet activity. The same rules apply today…unless you know with absolute certainty that a link in an email is legit, don’t click it. If you get an email from the IRS, they are only a phone call away to verify the legitimacy.

  2. New variation on an old scam. They used to use the phone first.

  3. IceColdLogic | August 29, 2017 at 11:21 am |

    “The IRS is telling citizens to remember that the agency never contacts a taxpayer through an intimidating email or phone call.” – article above

    Errr…. so how do they make contact?

    • Nasty letters with clear return addresses and no postage stamps. You can always check by looking up the address to verify what the letter indicated.

  4. The IRS is telling citizens to remember that the agency never contacts a taxpayer through an intimidating email or phone call. The IRS always, I will repeat always contacts you by mail.

  5. How is someone supposed to tell the difference with all the Obama era IRS scandals?

    • Trini Irish | August 29, 2017 at 9:36 am |

      easy, if you are a democrap and have no problems, or if you are conservative and have problems then it is the real deal

  6. arizona_bruce | August 29, 2017 at 8:40 am |

    With as untrustworthy as the IRS has proven to be, why would anyone trust anything that claims to be from them? In question ….. get their local phone # from information and call them. Do not respond with them via email, text, or maybe even in U.S. Mail.

  7. Clinicaleducator1 | August 29, 2017 at 8:26 am |

    The scammers are attempting to hit those (in their opinion) who are low information citizens. SURPRISE!! WE aren’t low information.

  8. Ethan Sparrow | August 29, 2017 at 7:26 am |

    Actually, it was announced last year that the IRS had begun sending emails…so, how do you tell the difference..?
    Just don’t click on any links…

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